Stop and Think

Disability in Fiction: Wrapping Up and Looking Forward

Posted by on Feb 27, 2017 in Stop and Think | 0 comments

Disability in Fiction: Wrapping Up and Looking Forward

This marks the final post in the Disability in Fiction blog series–and what a fabulous two months it’s been! From finding new reads (and people to follow), to gaining needed perspective, to grasping the impact of ableism and the power of art, the authors of these blog posts have brought so much forward to be considered. (For those just finding this post, there are links to the full series at the bottom.)

As I wrap up this series, I find myself looking at the world around me, and my local context here in the US, and seeing the impact of ableism, discrimination, and/or simple lack of empathy.

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Ableism in Fiction – A Guest Post by Erin Hawley | Disability in Fiction

Posted by on Feb 20, 2017 in Stop and Think | 1 comment

Ableism in Fiction – A Guest Post by Erin Hawley  |  Disability in Fiction

Growing up as an avid reader, I never came across any disabled authors or characters in literature. Before the internet, I only had access to my small-town school library. Seeking out books with disabled characters never crossed my mind; disability was something that I had and not part of my proclaimed identity as it is now. For most of my childhood, abled was the norm, even though I’ve been disabled my whole life. I was the only visibly disabled person in my social circle, and I wasn’t aware of invisible disabilities as a concept.

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Art as Activism – A Guest Post by Anarcha Quinn | Disability in Fiction

Posted by on Feb 13, 2017 in Stop and Think | 2 comments

Art as Activism – A Guest Post by Anarcha Quinn | Disability in Fiction

I warm welcome to Anarcha Quinn today as she shares with us a post on the power of art in the current day context here in the US–although I believe that you will find this post easily translates to anywhere in the world. It’s a vitally important post, and I’m so glad to be able to share it with you today.

For many of us, the places and the spaces we inhabit have changed monumentally since election night. Where we fit. Where we sit in society. How our fellow human beings care for us or don’t — all of that has been shuffled. Reshuffled. Even shaken down to the core.

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Why Representation In YA Matters – A Guest Post by Elsa Henry | Disability in Fiction

Posted by on Feb 6, 2017 in On Writing, Stop and Think | 9 comments

Why Representation In YA Matters – A Guest Post by Elsa Henry  | Disability in Fiction

Today’s post is on about writing and reading, it’s about the vital role representation plays for our youth. If you never see yourself in the books you read, or in the stories around you, whatever their medium, it becomes a struggle to see yourself in the world in a positive and whole way. I know I’ve struggled with this myself, and I am so honored today to share this post by Elsa Henry on growing up with just such a lack of representation, and the vital role writers today face in filling that void.

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Reading While Disabled: Kid/YA Lit Faves (Part 2) | Disability in Fiction

Posted by on Jan 30, 2017 in Books, Stop and Think | 4 comments

Reading While Disabled: Kid/YA Lit Faves (Part 2)  |  Disability in Fiction

We’re back with Part 2 of Reading While Disabled. Today, Alice Wong has asked the same group of five disabled readers to share the books they read growing up that had disabled characters (if any) and the impact of that, as well as books they’d recommend now. The conversation wraps up with a discussion of the We Need Diverse Books movement and the importance of representation.

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What Is Your Life’s Blueprint? – Reflections on MLK Jr’s Speech

Posted by on Jan 16, 2017 in Stop and Think | 5 comments

What Is Your Life’s Blueprint? – Reflections on MLK Jr’s Speech

As we pause to reflect on the awesome legacy of Martin Luther King Jr, and the work that remains to us, I find myself going back to one of the reverend’s less well-known speeches. Most of us have read or watched or even studied his “I Have A Dream” speech, and it is fantastic and inspirational, and rhetorically brilliant. But I find Mr. King’s speech, given to an assembly of junior high school students six months before his assassination, the one that helps me most in looking forward and thinking about where I want to go, and how.

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